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August 14, 2018: What to Know

A tragic bridge collapse in Genoa, a terrorist attack in London, a Treasure Valley cyclist is killed, Aretha Franklin is gravely ill and hundreds of stolen Netflix, HBO and Hulu passwords are being sold on the "dark web." On the bright side, Disney has released a first glimpse of its live-action Mulan. Authorities in Italy say at least 22 people were killed early today when a highway bridge in the port city of Genoa collapsed. The BBC reports the number of casualties could be considerably higher. Police in London, England, are treating the latest incident of a driver striking several pedestrians as a terrorist attack. The New York Times reports that the driver struck pedestrians and cyclists before crashing into a security barrier outside of Parliament this morning. The driver, a man in his 20s, was arrested. There were no weapons in his car. A 71-year-old Eagle woman is the latest Idaho cyclist to be killed this summer, during what has been called "the 100 deadliest days," the stretch of time between Memorial Day and Labor Day. The Ada County Coroner identified the victim as Joann Baker of Eagle. She died of blunt force trauma. The Ada County Sheriff's Office said Baker was riding a bike near a crosswalk when she was struck by a vehicle travelling southbound on Edgewood Lane. Baker was wearing a helmet when the crash occurred. The investigation continues. Hundreds of stolen Netflix, HBO and Hulu passwords are being sold on the so-called "dark web." Media Player News reports that the content-security firm Irdeto has discovered the credentials being marketed on at least 15 websites, which are cloaked by secret access protocols. Owners of a French theme park have begun using an old-school method to pick up trash. NPR reports that the Puy du Fou theme park in western France is using six trained crows to pick up paper and cigarette butts in exchange for food. Music legend Aretha Franklin is reported to be seriously ill. CNN reports that the 76-year-old Franklin is in hospice care at her home. The Walt Disney Studio has released the first image of its much-anticipated live-action Mulan. Production of the remake of the classic animated feature began August 13, and filming will take place in China and New Zealand. The cast includes Liu Yifei as Mulan, plus Jet Li, Gong Li and Donnie Yen. …

Published on 14 August 2018 | 1:52 pm


Campfire Stories to Bring Tales of Immigration to Txikiteo

Starting at 8 p.m., a slate of storytellers and poets with DACA ties, including Boise poet Hannah Q. Rodabaugh, Elizabeth Almanza, Ben Stein and Maria Andrade, will share stories of immigration. In 2017, hundreds of concerned citizens gathered at the Idaho State Capitol to hear the stories of DACA recipients. Rixa Rivera Sandoval, who came to the United States on an undocumented basis when she was 1 1/2 years old, remembered her mother telling her that because of her immigration status, she might never realize her dream of becoming a police officer. "'Mija, I don't want to tell you this, but I think you can't. We're not here the legal way,'" Sandoval recalled her mother saying. From the earliest days of Donald Trump's presidency, DACA, which allows undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to remain here, has been a political football, but the social and political tensions that swirl around the program are only a few of the reasons to swing by Txikiteo this evening (Aug. 13) for Campfire Stories. Starting at 8 p.m., Boise-based author and current Idaho Writer in Residence Christian Winn will introduce a slate of storytellers whose work touches on DACA, including Boise poet Hannah Q. Rodabaugh, Elizabeth Almanza, Ben Stein and Maria Andrade. Together, they will snatch DACA from national headlines and make it personal, conjuring the dignity and humanity of the people who rely on it to make the U.S. their home.…

Published on 13 August 2018 | 9:51 pm


Urban Fox Coffee & Boba Blends Local Tastes with Asian Imports

Urban Fox offers Taiwanese-inspired sweet toast and boba tea, along with locally sourced coffee and pastries. Urban Fox Coffee & Boba is an undeniable hybrid: Its corner store off of Eagle and Ustick roads in Meridian sells Boise-sourced coffee and pastries (courtesy of Caffeina and Gaston's Bakery) alongside Taiwanese-inspired boba tea and sweet toast, all surrounded by sleek, modern decor that looks like it could have come straight off of Pinterest, Instagram or Etsy. The vibe is courtesy of Owner Haena Cho's California roots. Cho moved to Boise from the San Francisco Bay Area about a year ago to help her parents run a local restaurant. But when her family gave up the restaurant in search of a quieter retirement, Cho decided to strike out on her own and fill what she felt was a vacant niche in the Boise restaurant scene—despite being an accountant by trade. "I don't see a lot of boba places around here," she said. "Back in San Francisco they used to be on every other corner. So I thought it would be a nice venture, but at the same time I'm a coffee girl, so I couldn't give up [that]." Boba tea, or bubble tea, is a sweet Taiwanese drink that mixes a milk base with tea, sweetener and other flavorings, served with chewy tapioca balls or fruit-flavored jellies at the bottom. While Urban Fox isn't the only boba spot in Boise (Boise Boba, Snake River Tea and a handful of Asian restaurants also offer it) it's likely one of the best researched. "I went around Los Angeles and the Bay Area for about a month and a half, tasting the boba and looking for boba suppliers," Cho said. She finally settled on Tea La Coffee Inc., a company out of Paramount, California. The choice was a good one: The milk in the Thai tea-flavored drink was rich with herb notes, and the tapioca balls were soft and chewy, taken to the next level by a punch of caramel sweetness. Perhaps the shop's best Asian import, though, is its sweet toast, a play on a French toast-type dessert (sans egg) popular in Japan, Taiwan and Singapore that Urban Fox makes with bread from Acme Bakeshop. Cho explained: "Sweet toast is similar to brick toast. You get this big, thick piece of white bread, add butter, toast it [and serve it] with a little sweetened syrup on top, fruit toppings and whipped cream." The final product was a true confection, caught somewhere…

Published on 13 August 2018 | 8:00 pm


August 13, 2018: What to Know

A national coalition of newspapers will push back against Trump's attacks on the media, two Idaho little league teams are heading to national championship tournaments, two 11-year-olds hack into a replica of the Florida election system and a rooftop bathtub cinema will be appear in Tokyo next weekend. White House officials say they'll try to block the release of any other secret recordings from Omarosa Manigault Newman, a former White House aide. On Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, Newman aired a recording of her being fired by White House Chief of Staff John Kelly inside the White House Situation Room. CNN reports that security analysts said any such recordings inside the Situation Room are a huge violation of strict internal procedures and highlight the flouting of safety and security protocols inside the Trump White House. The Boston Globe's editorial board says it's trying to organize a national campaign to encourage hundreds of newspapers to run op-eds this Thursday, Aug. 16, condemning President Trump's attacks on the media. So far the Globe says at least 70 newspapers have agreed to participate. "We are not the enemy of the people," said Marjorie Pritchard, the Globe's deputy managing editor. Two Idaho little league baseball teams won their respective regional baseball playoffs this weekend, sending each to separate national tournaments. The Mountain View Toros is the first Treasure Valley team to reach the American Legion World Series, a tournament for players 19 and younger. It will play this Thursday, Aug. 16, in a game streamed by ESPN 3. Meanwhile, the Coeur d'Alene Majors will play in the Little League World Series, a tournament for players 10 to 12 years old, this Friday, Aug. 17. That game will be televised by ESPN. Brooks Koepka held off a charge from golf legend Tiger Woods to win the PGA Championship on Sunday. ESPN reports that it was 28-year-old Koepka's second major championship this year, after winning the U.S. Open in June. It's been just a year since Woods began swinging a golf club again following spinal-fusion surgery in April 2017. Security experts are stunned that an 11-year-old boy was able to hack into a replica of the Florida state election website and change the voting results in under 10 minutes. PBS reports that the boy was among a group of about 50 children and thousands of adults attending the world's largest yearly hacking convention, DEFCON 26. An 11-year-old girl also managed to make changes to the same Florida replica website in about 15 minutes, tripling the number of votes found there.  The western U.S. isn't the only region baking in this summer's heat. Tokyo is also experience record-breaking temperatures. And The Hollywood Reporter…

Published on 13 August 2018 | 1:53 pm


Listen Here: The Debaucherauntes

Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, Wednesday, Aug. 15 The music that the Seattle-based band The Debaucherauntes produces is just what you’d imagine after reading its name: lush and over-the-top, with an operatic edge that would be perfectly at home on a Broadway stage. Drawing on Klezmer and Yiddish musical tradition, as well as cabaret and vaudeville, The Debaucherauntes has its own brand—not least because a good portion of its music is in Yiddish, not English. In “Bei Mir Bist Du Sheyn,” a track from its debut album, Different Parade (self-released, 2015), brassy instrumentation and violins war with rich, dramatic vocals that bring to mind a smokey saloon, or women in high heels stumbling down rain-soaked streets. The English track share the same theatricality. In “Take Your Money (Sleep Alone)” the vocalist croons about long dresses and pointy shoes, which are “never what a serving girl should wear/so take your money and go home/if you can’t be nice you sleep alone.” If you’re in the mood to be transported back in time and across the world, stop by Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel in Boise to see The Debaucherauntes perform live as part of the Jewish Music Festival. But be forewarned: the band describes its concerts on Facebook as “everything you wish your circus-themed Bar Mitzvah would have been" and its entire project on Kickstarter as the same party "on whiskey and ecstasy."…

Published on 13 August 2018 | 10:00 am


Gooooooooal! International Soccer Friendly Returns to Boise's CenturyLink Arena

"It's a showcase for the city. We expect there's a trophy we'll hand out, and we hope it's something to do again in the future." Soccer friendlies are nothing new in Boise. In 2015, 22,000 fans watched Athletic Bilbao edge out Club Tijuana 2-0 during Boise's Jaialdi celebration, and last year, the U.S. National Arena team played Brazil in CenturyLink Arena. "It was really popular and sold out. We wanted to do it again, and we wanted to get more teams involved," said Brian McCormack, director of media relations for the Idaho Steelheads, which plays at CenturyLink Arena. "The fact that it's a tournament setup makes it more fun for everybody involved." This year, the event returns on a larger scale to the downtown sports arena. Four teams—the U.S., Colombia, Mexico and Somalia—will play for honor and glory on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 17 and 18. On Friday, Colombia and Mexico will kick off the tournament at 5:30 p.m. Afterward, at 7:30 p.m., Somalia and the U.S. will spar. On Saturday, the losers of Friday the Friday matches will play at 5 p.m., and the winners will play at 7 p.m. McCormack said the event should turn heads in Boise and around the world. "It's a showcase for the city. We expect there's a trophy we'll hand out, and we hope it's something to do again in the future," he said.…

Published on 12 August 2018 | 4:00 pm


Basque Museum to Host 21st-Annual Winefest on Boise's Basque Block

On Friday, Aug. 17, over 100 wines will be poured in the block against the festive backdrop of live music, raffles and performances by the Oinkari Basque dancers. This year marks the 21st edition of the annual Winefest in the Basque Block, a Basque Museum and Cultural Center fundraiser that’s grown larger year by year. On Friday, Aug. 17, over 100 wines will be poured in the block against the festive backdrop of live music, raffles and performances by the Oinkari Basque Dancers. When Winefest started, it used to have silent auctions, but transitioned to raffle prizes when organizers ran out of room for the auction items and the ever-growing selection of wines. “We only had a few dozen wines and about 100 or so people in participation [in 1997],” said Basque Museum Executive Director Annie Gavica. “At the time it was really only people from the Basque community. Now, we have nearly 1,000 people that show up and we close off the Basque Block.” The wines are selected by volunteers and members of a wine board that convenes for the event. A typical Basque wine is made from tempranillo grapes, and four local wineries will be pouring Tempranillo wines at the festival: Sawtooth Winery, Vizcaya Winery, Fujishin Family Cellars and Indian Creek Winery. Kelli Geselle, manager at Sawtooth Winery, said the Boise climate is similar to the region where tempranillo grapes are traditionally grown. “We have similar climates to the La Rioja region in Spain,” said Geselle. “Our climate, our elevation, and our hot summer days and then the cool summer nights are very similar to what they have there.” Wines made from tempranillo grapes generally have a smoky aroma, with fruity undertones. “A lot of Tempranillos have a kind of cigar box or a tobacco note in it,” said Geselle. “They also get more of a plum or raspberry note as well, versus a dark black cherry that you’ll find in a Shiraz, or like a black pepper that you’ll find in a Petite Sirah or a Cabernet Sauvignon. The Tempranillo are going to be a lot more smooth and have a lot more smoky notes to it. It’s great for barbeques because of that.” Sawtooth Winery is pouring its 2015 Tempranillo, along with its Sauvignon Blanc, Rose and Skyline Blend. The party starts at 5:30 p.m., and despite its name, Winefest is branching out to include hard cider this year, which will be poured by Meriwether Cider. Local restaurants from the Basque block will serve pintxos—Basque-style small plates similar to Spanish tapas. Attendees can…

Published on 12 August 2018 | 3:00 pm


Suspect is Arrested Near the Scene of Boise Stabbing Attack... One Day Later

Michael Rucker, 30, was booked into the Ada County Jail and charged with a felony count of aggravated assault. UPDATE: August 12, 2918 A suspect has been taken into custody and charged with an August 10 stabbing in Boise.  Law enforcement confirmed  Saturday night that they had arrested 50-year-old Michael Rucker on the 500 block of Americana Boulevard, the same block where he's accused of stabbing another man 24-hours earlier, sending the victim to a local hospital with life-threatening injuries. When Boise Police first reported the incident, they gave Nampa as Rucker's address, but when Rucker was booked ino the Ada County Jail Saturday night, officials reported that Rucker was from Boise. Rucker faces a felony count of aggravated battery. ORIGINAL POST: August 11, 2918 Boise Police are looking for a male suspect in the wake of a stabbing late Friday night on the 500 block of Americana Boulevard. Witnesses told police that two men were in a physical altercation when one of the men stabbed the other. The victim, an adult male, was rushed to a local hospital with what were believed to be life-threatening stab wounds. Police have identified the suspect as 30-year-old Michael Rucker of Nampa. While the investigation is ongoing, police are asking anyone with information to contact Ada County dispatch at 208-377-6790 or Crime Stoppers at 208-343-COPS.…

Published on 12 August 2018 | 12:59 pm


First-Ever Boise Corgi Fest to Debut in Ann Morrison Park

The party will kick off with a "Pup Parade" at 10 a.m. Aug. 18, followed by a canine costume contest, corgi-themed raffle and silent auction, a peanut butter-sweet potato pie eating contest for dogs and even a corgi derby. Pembroke Welsh corgis are perhaps the internet's favorite dog breed. With their stubby legs, rust-orange fur, giant ears and adorable antics, they're the darlings of viral cartoons and videos. Now, Boise corgi owner Lauren Studley is translating online corgi-mania into a free, real-life event: the first-ever Boise Corgi Fest, slated for Saturday, Aug. 18, in Ann Morrison Park. "I know from personal experience, from owning a corgi, that interest in the breed has skyrocketed in the Boise area recently," Studley said. "When I bought my corgi six years ago, we were on the forefront of that popularity. We created a Facebook group called Stubby Strutters, we had a corgi-themed See Spot Walk team, and in the last few years it has just exploded. There are more breeders, more people interested in the breed, and any time that there is a rescue that comes in through the [Idaho] Humane Society they get grabbed up pretty fast." Studley said it was noticing that trend, along with having some free time as a stay-at-home mom to her new baby, that inspired her to create Corgi Fest. While the fest focuses on corgis, leashed dogs of any shape, size and breed are welcome to attend the fun, which will stretch from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in downtown Boise's Ann Morrison Park. It's set to be a day jam-packed with events. The party will kick off with a "Pup Parade" (Studley noted that the route will be short, in deference to the short legs and big bellies that give corgis their signature waddle) at 10 a.m., followed by a canine costume contest, corgi-themed raffle and silent auction, a peanut butter-sweet potato pie eating contest for dogs (corgis are known to have voracious appetites) and even a corgi derby—a 100-foot race across the grass that promises to be almost too cute to be allowed. "We're totally cheesing it up," Studley said. Between events, dogs and their owners can browse booths set up by pup-oriented businesses like dog boarders, pet supply stores, dog trainers and canine-focused charities. If the mere presence of so many pups isn't heartwarming enough, the event will also be a fundraiser for IHS and Fuzzy Pawz Rescue.…

Published on 11 August 2018 | 7:00 pm


Citing Dropping Natural Gas Prices, Intermountain Gas Proposes Rate Decrease for Residential, Commercial Customers

The proposed decrease is part of a Purchased Gas Adjustment application which is filed each year by the utility. Pointing to a decline in the price of natural gas that it purchases for its customers, Intermountain Gas is proposing a rate decrease of approximately 10.2 percent. If approved, the decrease would be effective Monday, Oct. 1 and drop the monthly bill of an average residential customer by about $4.12. Commercial customers, on average, would see a decrease of about $21.89 per month. The proposal still needs a full review and approval from the Idaho Public Utilities Commission. A copy of the proposal can be viewed by clicking here. "Because of industry-specific technological advances in exploration, production and energy efficiency measures, nationwide supply of natural gas continues to outplace demand, which contributes to lower natural gas prices," said Intermountain Gas exeuctive vice president Scott Madison in a prepared statement. The proposed decrease is part of a Purchased Gas Adjustment application which is filed each year by the utility.…

Published on 11 August 2018 | 12:24 pm


Attorney for Ada County Treasurer Enters Not Guilty Pleas to Charges of Misusing Public Funds

In advance of her arraignment scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 14, Ada County Treasurer Vicki McIntyre's attorney has filed a plea of not guilty to all charges. Ada County Treasurer Vicky McIntyre, currently suspended from her position, has officially pleaded not guilty to seven counts of misusing public funds. On July 26, McIntyre was escorted from her office at the Ada County Courthouse after Ada County Commissioners suspended her until further notice. Prosecutors said McIntyre allegedly used a county credit card to purchase entertainment tickets, personal transportation and other personal expenses. In advance of her arraignment, scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 14, McIntyre's attorney has filed a plea of not guilty to all charges. Earlier this year, an internal Ada County audit reportedly discovered that McIntyre had used a county credit card for personal purchases, but when County Commissioners asked McIntyre to surrender her card, she refused, insisting that she had paid back the purchases. In May, McIntyre lost a Republican primary in a statewide race to see who would represent the GOP in this November's general election for Idaho State Treasurer.…

Published on 10 August 2018 | 7:35 pm


August 10, 2018: What to Know

Today is expected to be the hottest Aug. 10 on record in Boise, the Boise Hawks will host its league's all-star game next season, some NFL players resume their national anthem protests, Idaho DMV offices will be closed again today and some critics say The Meg has jumped the shark—and it's not a compliment. After Boise hit a record high temperature for Aug. 9 (105 degrees) on Thursday, the National Weather Service says the City of Trees can expect another record high later today, when temperatures will hover around 106 degrees. An excessive heat warning remains in effect until midnight tonight, but temperatures are expected to cool off a bit when a cold front pushes in from the west. The forecast high in Boise for Sunday, Aug. 12, is 90 degrees. Meanwhile, this morning's New York Times has a timely report on how global warming is a fact of life across the planet. Globally, 2018 is shaping up to be the fourth-hottest year on record. And yes, scientists say Earth's temperatures are still rising. Idaho State Police report that there has been another fatality in this, the "100 deadliest days" that stretch between Memorial Day and Labor Day. John Kinghorn, 87, of Nampa was killed Thursday when his ATV struck a car on Ustick Road between Northside and Midland boulevards. ISP said Kinghorn was not wearing a helmet. Idaho DMV offices will be closed across the state again today. Idaho Transportation Department officials said they're updating the computer systems used to issue drivers licenses and identification cards. The offices will reopen Monday, Aug. 13. The owners of the Boise Hawks announced Thursday that they'll host the Northwest-Pioneer League All-Star Game in August 2019. Hawks officials added that they're drawing an average of 3,200 fans per-game at Memorial Stadium this season. That's a 40 percent increase since Agon Sports & Entertainment bought the Hawks in 2014. The national anthem controversy has returned to the NFL. During several preseason games last night, pro football players either knelt, raised their fists or simply refused to take the field as the national anthem was played. CNN reports that the renewed protests resurfaced after NFL officials sought to put the controversy behind them by crafting a new policy (now on a temporary hold) requiring athletes to "stand and show respect for the flag and the anthem." A number of NFL players say league officials are missing the point of their protests against policy brutality. Warner Brothers is hoping that its new film, The Meg, opening today in theaters across North America, will revive some of the excitement of the 1975 blockbuster Jaws. But critics aren't being too kind to The Meg. Variety says actor Jason Statham "leads a B-movie…

Published on 10 August 2018 | 2:00 pm


University of Idaho Law Professor to Discuss Police Use of Deadly Force at Vandal Voices Event

"Why is it that so often we have shootings that don't resolve in indictments, and if a family sues, they don't win a civil judgement? There are reasons those things happen, and we have dissatisfactory results." Before taking a job at the University of Idaho College of Law, Associate Professor Katherine Macfarlane worked for two years defending officers with the New York Police Department in civil suits about police use of force. Between 2011 and 2013, she said she was involved in approximately 80 cases. "I've been on both sides of the aisle and seen what the police shooting training looks like," she said. The age of camera phones has helped make police use of force into headline material, but justified or unjustified, violence coming from the people entrusted with public safety is nothing new. According to Macfarlane, the U.S. Supreme Court has placed relatively few restrictions on cops when it comes to using pepper spray, billy clubs, Tasers and even firearms. On Thursday, Aug. 16, Macfarlane will host the latest installment in the Vandal Voices series, "When Police Shoot to Kill, the Law and the Use of Deadly Force," at Ha'Penny Bridge Irish Pub and Grill. There, she will discuss high-profile instances of police violence, its history and the legal mechanisms that are triggered when officers are accused of brutality. "Why is it that so often we have shootings that don't resolve in indictments, and if a family sues, they don't win a civil judgement? There are reasons those things happen, and we have dissatisfactory results," she said. To answer her own question, Macfarlane said police are protected by a high latitude to make "reasonable mistakes" when it comes to protecting the public through a use of force—a topic she will delve into at length at her "Shoot to Kill" presentation. She will also discuss the role of race and implicit bias in policing, noting that racial bias affects both suspects and police officers of color alike. That can be a touchy thing to talk about: When the event was announced on a University of Idaho Facebook page, Macfarlane said one person left a message saying "implicit bias doesn't exist." Ask Macfarlane, though, and she'll say that in many instances involving interactions with the police, "There are different scenarios that play out based on who you are," and as the Gem State's population booms, that's increasingly an issue the public should understand. "With our growing Hispanic population, it's something that even in Idaho we have to be aware of," she said.…

Published on 10 August 2018 | 2:00 pm


Nampa Festival of the Arts

The Nampa Festival of the Arts runs Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 11-12, at Lakeview Park. Boise has Art in the Park, Sun Valley has the Arts & Crafts Festival and Nampa has the Festival of the Arts—a cultural institution in the city since 1986, which this year will highlight nearly 200 artists against the lush backdrop of Lakeview Park. The festivities will run Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 11-12, and the Nampa Parks & Recreation Department, which hosts the event, expects as many as 18,000 art-lovers to pass through. Attendees can wander from booth to booth, snack on food from more than a dozen vendors (Kanak Attack, Coned Pizza and Donut DeLights among them) and listen to live music from acts like Carmel and the Closers, the Billy Blues Band, Shot Glass, Red Light Challenge and more over two afternoons. A juried art show will also take place in the Rose Garden, where guests are invited to vote for their favorite pieces until 2 p.m. on Sunday, when they'll be tallied for a people's choice award that will be announced half an hour later on the main stage. Plus, there will be a kid's art booth and bounce houses to entertain the little ones. Whether you're into oil paint or watercolor, yard art or handcrafted wood, the Nampa Festival of the Arts is sure to have at least one booth that catches your eye. And considering it's open to the public for free, there's no reason not to spend an afternoon scoping it out. Find a map and more event details on the festival's Facebook page.  [pdf-1]…

Published on 9 August 2018 | 8:21 pm


Report: Idaho Falling Short in Cancer-Fighting Policies

“This year alone in Idaho, 8,450 people will be diagnosed with cancer and more than 3,000 will die from the devastating disease. We owe it to them ... to improve access to screenings and treatment.” A new analysis of American states and public policies that help fight cancer gives Idaho low marks. The report, released this morning by the Cancer Action Network of the American Cancer Society says the Gem State "didn't measure up" to any of the policy recommendations in a number of areas, including funding for cancer screening programs, smoke-free laws, cigarette tax levels, funding for tobacco prevention and cessation programs, and access to care through Medicaid. Luke Cavener, government relations director for ACS CAN, points to the current effort to expand Medicaid coverage which will be put before Idaho voters in this November's general election as a step in the right direction. "One critical area where voters have the power to make a difference for Idahoans immediately is passing Proposition 2 to expand Medicaid,” said Cavener. “This year alone in Idaho, 8,450 people will be diagnosed with cancer and more than 3,000 will die from the devastating disease. We owe it to them and everyone at risk of developing the disease to do what we know works to prevent cancer and improve access to screenings and treatment.” The report, titled the "How Do You Measure Up?," color-coded how well Idaho is doing in each issue. Green indicates best practices, yellow indicates moderate movement and red indicates where the state is falling short: Increased Access to Medicaid: RED Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Funding: RED Access to Palliative Care: RED Pain Policy: YELLOW Cigarette Tax Rates: RED Smoke-free Laws: YELLOW Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program Funding: RED Medicaid Coverage of Tobacco Cessation Services: YELLOW Indoor Tanning: RED …

Published on 9 August 2018 | 4:08 pm


As Blazes Continue to Scorch the West, Boise State Extends Admission Deadline for Student Firefighters

"The university recognizes these students’ roles in protecting the state and region’s natural resources." As thousands of students begin arriving on the campus of Boise State University for the fall semester, which officially begins Monday, Aug. 20, university officials announced this morning that they are extending admission, registration and check-in deadlines for students who are battling wildfires across the west. "The university recognizes these students’ roles in protecting the state and region’s natural resources," read an official statement from Boise State. "Students providing proof of their status as a firefighter this summer will receive an extension through Friday, Aug. 31." The university's Office of Enrollment Services will coordinate any requests for extension, and faculty members have been asked to allow late-arriving students to catch up with missed assignments. Student firefighters or their family members are encouraged to contact the university at 208-426-2384 for assistance.…

Published on 9 August 2018 | 3:05 pm


August 9, 2018: What to Know

An excessive heat warning is issued for the Treasure Valley, a U.S. Congressman is arrested, two major mergers are called off and get set for what NASA says will be the best meteor shower of the year. The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings for the Treasure Valley, eastern Idaho and sections of the west central mountains, including McCall, for today and Friday, Aug. 10. Today's temperatures in Boise are expected to hover near, or at, the record high of 105 degrees, set back in 1875. Details are still sketchy, but Boise Police took a woman, naked and wielding a knife, into custody early this morning. BPD was summoned to 13th and Myrtle streets just before 1 a.m., where police used a Taser to subdue the suspect and load her into an ambulance. No word yet on her identity, her condition or pending charges. U.S. House Representative Chris Collins (R-New York) was arrested Wednesday and charged with insider trading. The New York Times reports that Collins insists he's innocent and will remain on the ballot this November. Albertsons and Rite Aid have called off their plans to merge. The two mega-retailers announced this past February that they would join forces, but CNBC reports that the deal has been shelved pending what was expected to be a less-than-enthusiastic shareholder vote. Meanwhile, Tribune Media says it's ending its deal to merge with the Sinclair Broadcast Group, and is suing Sinclair for breach of contract. CNN reports that the Federal Communications Commission had questioned whether the pending agreement was in the public interest. Tribune employees were notified that the deal was off in a lengthy early-morning memo from Kern that blasted Sinclair and said Tribune had done "everything it was supposed to do." The biggest names in professional golf tee off today in the last major of the year—the 100th PGA Championship, being played this year at Bellerive Country Club in St. Louis, Missouri. Stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere should get quite a show this weekend when another meteor shower appears overhead. NASA says that the so-called "Perseids" show up about this time each year when the Earth ventures through pieces of debris left behind by an ancient comet. Experts say the best views should come around the time the night nears dawn. …

Published on 9 August 2018 | 1:49 pm


Caldwell to Host First 'Farm-to-Cork' Dinner in New Indian Creek Plaza

The four-course meal on Saturday, Aug. 18, will pair Scoria Vineyards wines with inventive dishes created by Chef Gordon Epperson of Gordon's Catering. Caldwell's Indian Creek Plaza has been open for less than a month, but Destination Caldwell is already putting it to good use as an event venue. Its latest brainchild is a series of "Farm-to-Cork" dinners spotlighting Caldwell wineries and a rotating cast of local chefs; guests to these upscale parties will sit family-style at a single table on the plaza, sipping wine in the summer sun. The first four-course meal on Saturday, Aug. 18, will pair Scoria Vineyards wines with inventive dishes created by Chef Gordon Epperson of Gordon's Catering. "We want to tap into those individuals who love and enjoy wine," said Melissa Nodzu, director of events for the plaza. "People who have never, or seldom ever, travelled to Caldwell. Ideally, we want to capture an audience within a 30- to 40-mile radius of the plaza; people who are looking for new experiences and are interested in learning more about the agricultural diversity of Canyon County." Epperson certainly plans to spotlight that diversity. His menu, drawn up after a tasting of four different wines from Scoria, has a hyper-local focus and breaks out of the usual appetizer-to-entree-to-dessert order mold.  "We don’t have to follow traditional lines when we do these tastings—the wines pretty much tell us what we can do," Epperson said, adding, "All of our dishes are invented just for this purpose." Epperson gave Boise Weekly a peak at the preliminary menu, which includes:  1) Dry Riesling Course: Almond, fig and date grilled cheese toasted ravioli. Golden apple, Zephyr squash and Thai basil slaw with fresh lime, honey-lemon-thyme vinaigrette. 2) Chardonnay Course: Greek lemon chicken with dill, capers, olives and lemongrass. Sweet mashers with cinnamon yam garnish and lemon preserves-infused olive oil drizzle. 3) Petit Verdot Course: Pork carnitas en mole with corn masa, toasted macadamia, glazed pepitas, pineapple sage and star anise Cotija. Dark chocolate sprinkle. 4) Malbec Course: Cherry balsamic glazed beef with Gorgonzola, Jamaican jerk-spice chimichurri and grilled garden squash. Cilantro-lime drizzle.   Dessert: Flying M coffee with a dark chocolate coconut macaroon. According to Destination Caldwell, ingredients for the dishes will be sourced from Justin Christensen Farms in Melba, Stewart Farms in Nampa, The Flying Pig Farm and Vogel Farms in Kuna, Lakeview Fruit in Caldwell, Wagner Farms in Meridian, True Roots Organics in Nyssa, Oregon, and Epperson's personal garden. While the Aug. 18 dinner won't be the first wine-related event on the plaza, it…

Published on 9 August 2018 | 10:00 am


Meet the 2018 Winners of the Idaho Governor's Awards in the Arts

The governor of Idaho gives Excellence in the Arts awards every other year. Here are the 2018 winners. Every other year since 1970, the governor of Idaho has bestowed the Governor's Awards in the Arts on artists, artisans and educators of merit. This year's award ceremony will take place on the second floor of the Idaho State Capitol rotunda on Thursday, Nov. 8. It will be the last time Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter will be in office to receive the winners, and the Idaho Commission on the Arts hopes to go big with this year's celebration. "We're really hoping to get [the Caldwell-based Mariachi Sol de Acapulco ensemble] to perform because that would be really spectacular," said Jocelyn Robertson, public information officer for ICA. GAA-winners are first nominated by members of their community, and those nominations are vetted by ICA's commissioners. Finally, they forward their list to the governor's office for his final decisions. Silver medallions designed by Idaho artist Elizabeth Wolf will be presented to the recipients at the award ceremony. Winners this year come from across the state, from Coeur d'Alene and Salmon to Idaho Falls and Caldwell, and Robertson said she personally is impressed with the geographic representation in this year's awards. "We are really excited at how it fell out geographically," she said. "We have the arts thriving throughout the state." So without any further ado, here are the winners: Excellence in the Arts:Mark Neiwirth, pianist and educator, Pocatello Diane Raptosh, writer and educator, Boise Excellence in Folk and Traditional Arts:Mariachi Sol de Acapulco, ensemble, Caldwell Jeff Minor, rawhide braider, silver engraver, saddlemaker, Salmon Support of the Arts:Surel’s Place, arts organization, Garden City Support of Arts Education:David Groth, retired fifth-grade teacher, Coeur d’Alene Alexa Stanger, museum educator, Idaho Falls Excellence in Arts Administration:Kristin Poole, arts administrator, Ketchum Carolyn White, arts administrator, Twin Falls Special Commendations:Boise Music Week, arts organization, Boise Dan Looney, visual artist, Meridian…

Published on 8 August 2018 | 4:44 pm


August 8, 2018: What to Know

It's too close to call in a special congressional election in Ohio, the Treasure Valley returns to triple digits, the president of USC resigns, Ofo walks away from hundreds of junked bikes in Dallas and vegan meals are all the rage at one NFL training camp. Southwest Idaho will return to the triple digits today, but the National Weather Service office in Boise says the hazy smoke coming into the region from Oregon and California will actually "keep temperatures from reaching their fullest potential." Boise will remain above 100 degrees through Friday evening, when the Treasure Valley is expected to get some relief. Saturday's high in Boise is expected to be 91 degrees. The New York Times says a special election to fill a U.S. House seat in Ohio is still too close to call. Republican Troy Balderson holds a slim lead, but as of sunrise, there were still thousands of absentee and provisional ballots left to be counted. Another major American university has been rocked by scandal. CNN reports that the president of the University of Southern California resigned Tuesday in the wake of a former campus gynecologist being accused of sexual misconduct. A former USC board member has been named interim president while a search for a permanent replacement continues. NPR reports that hundreds of bikes have been dumped at a recycling center in Dallas, Texas. Most of them are from the dockless bike-share company Ofo, which left the city after a brief but contentious presence in Dallas. Ofo is one of three bike-share companies that have departed from the Dallas market since June, when the city council approved regulations requiring companies to get permits and pay the city per-bike or per-scooter. The City of Boise is currently mulling its own set of rules as Ofo and other dockless bike share companies eye Boise as their next potential market. Business Insider reports that Heineken is betting on a new brew with THC as a key ingredient. Lagunitas, described as a "hoppy sparkling water," is already Heineken's fastest-growing product in California. With another NFL season right around the corner, training camps are intensifying for each of the league's teams. And ESPN says a growing number of the meals being served to some of the planet's toughest athletes are now meat-free. In fact, at the Tennessee Titans camp, ESPN reported vegan meals are all the rage, and 15 percent of the team's players have converted to vegan diets. …

Published on 8 August 2018 | 2:46 pm


This Land is... Whose Land?

"This issue is about so much more than Dry Creek. It's about who we are and where we're going." It is, quite likely, Idaho's most provocative compendium of long-form journalism this year. And that buzzworthy reporting, chronicling what may be the greatest ideological fissure of our time, can be found not in so-called "legacy" media but in the summer issue of Edible Idaho, a quarterly publication that has, in the past, lingered on mouth watering food stories. But earlier this year, as Edible Idaho Managing Editor Guy Hand was dining at Bittercreek in downtown Boise, a restaurant employee approached Hand, waving a copy of another publication. "You better look at this," said the restaurant employee. "This" was a back page advertisement in the most recent issue of Greenbelt Magazine, a photo-heavy Treasure Valley lifestyle publication often stacked on newsracks alongside Edible Idaho. "What I saw on that page raised the hairs on the back of my neck," said Hand. The glossy ad touted "farm-to-table" living at the soon-to-be-constructed Dry Creek Ranch, a proposed subdivision minutes from Boise city limits. The ad featured a child nuzzling up to a horse, and two young adults strolling through farmland and acres of lush, green fields in front of the Boise Foothills. Nowhere in the ad were there details on the fact that developer Boise Hunter Homes had designs to put 1,800 rooftops across those same fields. "At first blush, I thought it was just a bit of brainwashing, a developer hitching its wagon to the local food movement. I was appalled," said Hand. "But the more I talked to other people about it, the more I knew we had a real opportunity to do something different. So, Scott and I began sharing a Google docs sheet of possible stories." That would be Scott Ki, editor of Edible Idaho. "It didn't take long after he gathered a strong cadre of local journalists for the story pitches to start coming in," said Ki. Ultimately, those story pitches were curated down to a choice few, examining everything from an ever-increasing risk to the region's rich soil, to insight into urban farming and something that Edible Idaho called "The great Treasure Valley tradeoff" of developers gobbling up more farmland. Just so there would be no confusion when a reader picked up the summer edition of the magazine, its cover was an aerial photo of dozens of new homes edging closer and closer to farmland, and prominently stamped across Edible Idaho's cover were the words:…

Published on 8 August 2018 | 10:02 am


Walking the Line

"I think if you start to get into dancing around the things that you did, that's really, really dangerous territory." Kasey Anderson has fond memories of the last time he played Boise. He and his old alt-country band The Honkies opened for Counting Crows at the Idaho Botanical Garden in August 2012. The night before, members of both groups had held a two-hour jam session at Neurolux with acclaimed Americana artist Jason Isbell, who came over after playing a show at the Visual Arts Collective. "We tried to do stuff like that as much as we could, you know?" Anderson said. "If we were in a town where one of our friends was playing or one of our friends lived, we tried to get together and play with them if we could." Anderson remembers his former bandmates as "dedicated to the idea of rock and roll being as much fun as it could be as much of the time as it could be. ... I mean, I personally got carried away with it. Those other guys did a better job of reining it in." Anderson's fans found out just how carried away he'd gotten in January 2013, when he was arrested and charged with five counts of wire fraud. The charges centered on $586,000 that he took from 30 investors for a West Memphis Three benefit album and a series of related concerts, neither of which ever materialized. He pled guilty, received a four-year prison sentence, and was released in October 2016. Since he last played Boise six years ago, he has also gotten married and undergone treatment for substance abuse and Type I Bipolar Disorder. When Anderson returns to Neurolux on Thursday, Aug. 16, he'll be alone (aside from local opener Travis Ward) on his first U.S. tour since his arrest. The Portland, Oregon-based musician will play songs from the Honkies days as well as material off From a White Hotel (Jullian Records, 2018), the powerful debut album of his new roots-rock group Hawks and Doves. Anderson doesn't shy away from discussing his crimes and regrets. He addresses them explicitly on From a White Hotel's title track, in which he cops to doing "enough cocaine to raise my heroes from their graves" and "telling half a million lies / and living all around the world / on bread that wasn't mine." Anderson sees this directness as a way of holding himself accountable. "I think if you start to get into dancing around the things that you did, that's…

Published on 8 August 2018 | 10:01 am


Laura Welsh Berg and Nick Steen

"I can't tell you how much of a gift it has been to work on Jane Austen's text. Every look, every small comment, means something." When the Idaho Shakespeare Festival first unveiled its 2018 season, more than a few patrons took note of the fact that only one play from The Bard was on the schedule. Instead of an additional Shakespeare piece, a fresh stage adaptation of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice was slated to be the third production of the season. Apparently, that decision was spot on. Ticket sales are at an historic high for ISF this summer, and even before Pride and Prejudice began performances on Aug. 3, it was the hottest ticket in town, along with ISF's Mamma Mia! Boise Weekly sat down with ISF veterans Laura Welsh Berg and Nick Steen, who embody the iconic roles of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy, to chat about the much-anticipated production. Let's start off with talking about this season at the amphitheater. Yes, there are unprecedented ticket sales, but there's also a tangible energy in the audience. I've been attending ISF performances for years, but I don't remember a season quite like this one. Steen: It definitely feels electric when you're out there. And let's be clear: It's going fantastically, but there are still ways to get tickets. That said, our subscription base, I believe, is up something like 20 percent. Berg: Twenty-six percent. Steen: Wow. We're having a phenomenal year, and we're tremendously thankful for it. Berg: We drive around in Idaho Shakespeare Festival-labeled vehicles, and people stop us in parking lots to say, "'Hey we saw Mamma Mia! last night,' [or] 'We saw Macbeth and Misery.'" It's incredibly exciting. Is it true that Pride and Prejudice is already close to being sold out? Berg: Close. But definitely call the box office. Talk about great expectations. Berg: Pressure! It feels good to know that people want to see what you're doing. A lot of those expectations come from how popular Pride and Prejudice is as a book and on the screen. There have been a number of iconic performances of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy over the years. In the 1940s it was Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier. In the 1990s, it was Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth, and in 2005, it was Keira Knightley and Matthew Macfadyen. Berg: Pressure! Let's talk a bit about [ISF Producing Artistic Director] Charlie Fee's decision to mount this production in a slot usually reserved for a second Shakespeare play. Berg: I think it was pretty…

Published on 8 August 2018 | 10:01 am


BlacKkKlansman: Under the Hood

Now playing at The Flicks First, the good news—and to be sure, there is some in Spike Lee's new big-screen provocation, which got tongues wagging and took home the Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival this past spring. BlacKkKlansman includes sometimes-thrilling performances from its leads John David Washington (son of Denzel), Adam Driver and, in surprise cameos, Alec Baldwin, Harry Belafonte and Topher Grace (that last as KKK Grand Wizard David Duke). Lee also reminds us in several moments of BlacKkKlansman that his directorial skills are unparalleled, following a three-decade catalogue of American classics (Malcolm X, Do the Right Thing, Jungle Fever, She's Gotta Have It). All that said, the narrative of BlacKkKlansman feels as if it's plodding along rather than employing a full arc of surprises and plot twists. Which is rather stunning, considering its jaw-dropping source material: a 2014 autobiography from Ron Stallworth, an African-American police officer who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan. The delicious twist, of course, is that because Stallworth is African-American, he partnered with another undercover cop to portray him in Klan meetings. Unfortunately, BlacKkKlansman's producers want you know that twist right up front—in fact, even before you see the film. All of the trailers and commercials currently airing on national television, and all over the internet, reveal BlacKkKlansman's surprise, while the movie poster promises that the film is "based on a crazy, outrageous, incredible true story." Sad to say, by the end of the film (it runs 135 minutes and feels even longer), I was hoping for a bit more crazy. To be sure, Spike Lee is a master satirist and the first draft of BlacKkKlansman's screenplay came Lee's way from none other than this year's Oscar-winning screenwriter Jordan Peele (Get Out). On paper alone, my expectations for BlacKkKlansman were extremely high. But there's a reason that we don't hand out pieces of paper in the cinema. You've got to deliver your gut punches on screen. BlacKkKlansman was ultimately a very good film, but greatness was still beyond its reach. The film's release (it opens nationwide, including in Boise, on Friday, Aug. 10) is timed with the first anniversary of the infamous Unite the Right rally, when Klansmen, neo-Nazis, neo-Confederates and a whole lot more neo-racists stained the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, with blood and venom. Near the end of BlacKkKlansman, Spike Lee makes what I think is a ham-fisted choice to include a generous amount of news…

Published on 8 August 2018 | 10:01 am


The Art of Ag: Nampa AgriCULTURE Exhibition Spotlights Idaho's Farm and Ranch Roots

AgriCULTURE will hang at the Nampa Civic Center through Tuesday, Sept. 11. It can sometimes be hard to remember that farms and ranches used to fill the space where buildings now stand in Boise's constantly gyrating urban core. Just 30 minutes down the road in Nampa, however, Idaho's ag connection is much clearer—and still thriving. A new art exhibit at the Nampa Civic Center, dubbed AgriCULTURE: Influenced by the Land, is a visual reminder of the Gem State's roots as interpreted by more than 30 artists from the Nampa Art Collective. The exhibition is a humble one at first glance, lining just a single hallway. But like a field of sugar beets or mustard greens, a closer look reveals hidden complexity. Some works, like Leslie Jay Bosch's bright acrylic-and-paper collages of gem-like hot air balloons floating across farm fields, celebrate Idaho's agricultural aesthetic. Others, like Joan Thomas' earth-toned oil paintings of historic ag structures, including a disused barn and the Meridian Mill, are more personal. In her artist statement for Miller's Barn Revisited, Thomas wrote, "This barn is a fading but still-standing East Boise landmark. I obtained permission from the barn's owners to paint it plein air. In the process the family became friends, and I have been privileged to hear ranching and farming stories from many years ago as well as recent colorful stories of caring for their land and cattle." Most of the works are two-dimensional: Oil paintings, watercolors and pen-and-ink drawings abound, but their subject matter runs the gamut from a stylized picket-fence scene inspired by the garden in Peter Rabbit to a vibrant photograph of yellow canola blossoms. Of course, there are also many landscapes, often featuring tractors or farmers with truckloads of produce. Angela Stout, board president of the Treasure Valley Artists' Alliance (the umbrella under which the NAC falls), said the diversity of perspectives and media is perhaps the best of what AgriCULTURE has to offer. "It's a really good example of our eclectic membership," said Stout, "We had so many different styles, and they all took their different perspectives on the same topic ... It's a really wide example of the art that we have in the city." Stout's own contribution to the exhibition, a mixed-media piece called Blossoms made with sculpted cloth, was inspired by Idaho's scenic groves of fruit trees. In addition to the pieces lining the hall, a glassed-in display case houses the work of featured artist Robin Cox, as…

Published on 8 August 2018 | 10:01 am








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